drakesavedmylife:

The fall look is detaching yourself from masculinity entirely and reading a lot of female authors and painting your nails every week and listening to music that inspires you and writing daily.

My current state

(via drakesavedmylife)

The American South is a parody of itself

(Source: sneakerback, via mailorderwife)

blackholebellybutton:

whoops! gotta pick up the boys from soccer practice

blackholebellybutton:

whoops! gotta pick up the boys from soccer practice

vuls:

Pablo Picasso
Têtes (Heads), 1956

vuls:

Pablo Picasso

Têtes (Heads), 1956

(via ii2ii2)

'Pretty feminism' can't divide the movement

Feminism is a trend. As far as trends go, it isn’t a bad one. I much prefer people start advocating for gender equality than go back to the “Cool Story Bro” movement of 2010. However, a new kind of feminism has risen up, which I affectionately call “Pretty Feminism.” Pretty feminism is fun, sexy feminism, full of cute slogans and “This is what a feminist looks like” t-shirts. A pretty feminist is a feminist who everyone can get along with, not here to make anyone mad, just stating her opinion and moving on.

The problem with the rise of the pretty feminists is that they are taking over and forgetting about the messages of the movement they joined, and the people who were a part of the movement first. Like any other mainstream movement, feminism is becoming moderate, and dividing between the “pretty feminists” and the radicals.

Pretty feminism is unnervingly not intersectional. This stems from the fear that these feminists will rock the boat if they ask for too much. It’s not “too much” to advocate against the racism, transphobia, classism, and many other forms of oppression that women face, which is only exacerbated by sexism.

For example, as excited as feminists are about Emma Watson’s speech at the United Nations, she didn’t say anything new. She’s one more feminist from a long line of white, wealthy, celebrated, straight, cisgender women. Just like her predecessors, she addressed the struggles women face as a whole. But when feminists make blanket statements about the oppression of women, they are nearly always referring to women of privilege, women like Emma Watson.

Another example is that pretty feminists can easily quote the statistic that women make 77 cents to every man’s dollar. This specifically addresses white women vs. white men, and only in the United States. The day that white women make the same amount of money as their white male counterparts will not be cause for celebration for feminists, because it leaves behind the unequal pay given to non-white women. A movement cannot be feminist if it is not intersectional.

Feminism, in its new form, is being reconstructed to invite men to join the ranks of feminist women. The objective of this idea is clear: more feminists is a good thing, so we might as well invite the other half of the population to join the fight. Great. Men should be feminists, not because feminism is giving them a chance to voice their opinions, or because feminist women are suddenly not as intimidating, or because men’s voices in the conversation about gender inequality will actually get something done. Men should be feminists because everyone should be a feminist. Feminism wasn’t sitting around waiting for men to come in and legitimize the movement.

When a pretty feminist announces she is a feminist, certain phrases usually follow, defensively, as if to shield her from any criticism that may come from some non-feminists in the room. These phrases sound something like “but I don’t hate men,” or “but I’m not a crazy one, I still shave my legs” or, my personal favorite, “but I’m not a lesbian.” This is not the point. No one was asking if you were a lesbian, and if someone is, in 2014, still assuming that all feminists hate men, you don’t need to be talking to someone that ignorant, anyway.

Stop trying to separate yourself from the angry, ugly, lesbian, feminist caricatures that kept the movement going for years before Buzzfeed came around to save the day. Pretty feminists are creating a dichotomy, in which they are the good feminists, the ones who like men and wear pink and go to slut walks, and anyone who questions their moderate-liberal idealized version of feminism is a bad feminist—a radical feminist.

Obviously, for any social movement to take off, it must be made moderate. This way, it appeals to everyone and gets as many people as possible to hop on the social-justice bandwagon. For feminism, the sacrifice that comes with going moderate is a significant one. Feminism will fail if the movement is split between the radical and moderate, if it leaves behind the women who need to be heard the most, or if it becomes so wrapped-up in including men that the pillars of feminism become withered and abandoned. Feminism was fine before the pretty feminist came along, and it will thrive even greater once the trend fades away.

My name is on this article and after all the editing, I don’t feel like I wrote it. That’s not what an editor is supposed to do.

My article about pretty feminism was published and they edited the whole thing. it doesn’t even sound like my writing and they cut off the last two paragraphs so it doesn’t conclude at all I’m just so stressed

jesuisperdu:

ryannordkitchen:

jesuisperdu:

ryannordkitchen:

(via zwei-ketten)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/83754526@N06/11477202894/

(via zwei-ketten)